Sunday Legends-Open the Gates

sundaylegends

To compliment the superstition of birth, here are superstitions regarding burial-

-Burying a first-born child facedown would keep the family from having another child.

-Burying a witch facedown would keep him or her from interfering with the community.

-Some cultures hold that the last person buried in a cemetery would be the guard for that cemetery until the next burial.

-Graveyard dirt is considered powerful in many paths, and can be used to various effects depending on the grave it’s taken from. It’s considered polite to pay for the dirt by burying a coin in the hole from which the dirt is taken.

-The practice of burying bodies with the heads placed towards the east is fairly common, with meanings varying from culture to culture.

-Burying a person at a cross roads is generally considered to be a bad thing. Oddly, it’s sometimes suggested if you want to have a person become ‘stuck’ there-though I’m not sure what a person would have to do warrant that.

-Counting the cars in a funeral procession is considered bad luck.

-Mirrors should be covered when there has been a death in a household; mirrors are thin places where ghosts and other spirits can travel through-in some beliefs, to see the dead in the mirror is to bring another death into the house.

-For similar reasons, windows should be left open especially second story windows facing west.

 

-Carrying a body feet first out of a building insures the spirit won’t look back in and decide to stay.

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One comment

  1. Mirrors also need to be covered because the ghosts can become ‘stuck’ in them, resulting in a haunting at that location.

    Burials at a crossroads can be a handy tool if you think that the deceased might rise as a member of the undead. I remember hearing that after you destroy a vampire’s body, the ashes must be buried at a crossroads to be absolutely certain he won’t rise again. As werewolves are supposed to rise as vampires once they die, burying one at the crossroads just seems like good prevenative medicine.

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