Wicked Little Things

I am finding myself falling into a pattern of wanting to watch and rewatch movies I’ve already seen for comfort. I’ve already watched Sleepy Hollow five times since they put it on Netflix. I watched it this afternoon.

Coupled with issues with my joints making typing less than comfortable I haven’t been really been in the mood to want to sit down and blog.

But I have been spending time finding new blogs to put on the blog roll for when the weather turns (which I’m expecting it to do, like, tomorrow) and thinking a lot about folklore and the nature of modern folkloric thought versus the traditional (Holly voiced an opinion that long time readers of mine will recognize, that modern ‘followers’ of fae lore wouldn’t know what to do with a fae if it bit them, because they confuse Victoriana with faerie lore).

I put on Wicked Little Things as one of my fall back, comfort horror movies. I have seen this movie probably a dozen times since it hit cable and Netflix style viewing close to a decade ago now. On this viewing though I can tell you that I think that there is an element that I haven’t really paid attention to before-this could easily be a fairy (or faerie tale).

Karen moves her daughters Sarah and Emma into the woods on the mountain after her husband dies and leaves her the family homestead. She has no choice, the medical bills were too high for any other decision. Her new neighbors are spooked when they find out that she has moved her children into the woods and there is a continual warning to stay inside after dark. She is unsettled by her neighbors and their behavior, which begins to border on magical thinking.

Karen begins to find hints of a darker history in the community, one that’s linked to children and the mines further up the mountain. Her youngest daughter begins to talk about a child named Mary, and Sarah comes home with stories of dead children that straddle the line between zombies and ghosts. After a series of freakish nocturnal events, Karen begins to realize that her daughters have stumbled into something that she is forced to confront, violently.

Not a true faerie tale film, there is a heavy undercurrent of folkloric thought. It is not a stretch to make the band of children wandering the woods looking for the offspring of their captor the slaugh or an American Wild Hunt. The move into the cabin in the woods feels a lot like Vasilisa going deeper into the forest looking for Baba Yaga. The blood that’s used as the boundary between the living and the dead, that’s straight out of Celtic fae lore-amongst other world mythos. Is this all deliberate? Probably not, but having it on the forefront of my mind while rewatching this movie takes this film in a whole new direction on what is probably my 12th watch through since the movie came out in 2006.

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