gingerbread

Aran Gingerbread

finished aran gingerbread

I always feel weird posting about charity knitting. Like I’m looking to be validated for something that should be done because you want to, not so that other people will tell you you’re doing a good job.

But my finished project entries are as much a running record for myself as anything else.

My local Starbucks is collecting for Compass House this year, so this is the first scarf I’ve done for charity this year, and it went into the box.

Aran Gingerbread [3 Column, 8 Row Repeat]

Yarn: Red Heart Super Saver, Aran (cream white)

Skeins: 1

Yardage: 364 (less than)

Rep count/length: 37

Needles: 8

Pattern: Gingerbread

FSOT value: $31.65 American

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Garnet Gingerbread

garnet gingerbread

I really liked working with this yarn. It’s like Woolease, with a much better hand, better drape, and is heavier.

So of course they pulled it off the market. Why actually put out a decent Red Heart yarn? That would be silly.

This is the first Gingerbread project (I have another on needles right now, with some modifications to the pattern). I’m loving cabled scarves right now, and luckily they seem to be popular. This one is a gift, though.

I love the color on this one. I have a tendency to gravitate towards this color anyway, and it’s been a long standing favorite. Most of my lipstick collection is this color, and I have very little ‘true’ red in my wardrobe.

Garnet Gingerbread

Yarn: Red Heart With Wool, Garnet (deep wine style red)

Skeins: 2

Yardage: 288 (less than)

Needles: 8

Pattern: Gingerbread

FSOT value: $46.97 American

Gingerbread

gingerbread

Not that kind of gingerbread.

Mid asked me why I don’t draft my own patterns, especially for scarves. The simplest answer is that most of my scarves are either pulled from a stitch dictionary or something I made up on the fly to have travel/thoughtless knitting. But he’s probably right, and I probably should be writing them down again, if only to have a record of what I did.

Gingerbread is a simple travel/beginner’s cabling project. It does require some level of understanding of cabling-though the cables are exceptionally easy. For the scarf in the photo, I used a 4×4 back cable:

*work moss stitch to stockinette panel*

holding next four stitches to the back (either on a cable needle/dpn or air cabling), knit the next four stitches off of the needle, place the reserved four stitches back on the needle (if not air cabling) and knit those four stitches

*work moss stitch panel*

The pattern is adjustable in that you can alter how frequently you cable, the direction the cable leans, and change the width by adding or removing stitches to the moss stitch panels or increasing/decreasing the size of the cables. You can also change the needle size and the yarn weight to change size-a sport weight on fours will be narrower than the example scarf with worsted on eights which will be narrower than bulky on ten and halves.

Gingerbread Scarf

Worsted weight yarn [Aim for 300 yards or more for a cabled scarf]

Size 8 needles

Cable needle

Moss stitch [moss]

Across an odd number of stitches, moss stitch is simply knitting and purling every stitch straight across. If you were to work it on an even number it would be a rib

4×4 cable [4c]

Holding next four stitches to the back (either on a cable needle/dpn or air cabling), knit the next four stitches off of the needle, place the reserved four stitches back on the needle (if not air cabling) and knit those four stitches.

Place marker [pm]
Cast on 31 stitches

Knit one row (optional, but I find it makes it easier)

Next row:

Rws 1, 3, 5, 7: Moss for five stitches, pm, knit 8 stitches, pm, moss for five stitches, knit 8 stitches, pm, moss for five stitches

Even numbered rows: Moss for five stitches, pm,purl 8 stitches, pm, moss for five stitches, purl 8 stitches, pm, moss for five stitches

Row 9: Moss for five stitches, pm, 4c, pm, moss for five stitches, 4c, pm, moss for five stitches

Row 10: Moss for five stitches, pm,purl 8 stitches, pm, moss for five stitches, purl 8 stitches, pm, moss for five stitches

 

Repeat rows 1-10 for desired length. Bind off in pattern. Weave in any ends and very lightly block if using a natural fiber-cables don’t like heavy blocking.

gingerbread 2

 

 

 

 

 

Soft Gingerbread Cookies (31 Days of Baking)

softgingerbreadcookies

I’m terrible at plating. And my photography skills are only passing. Part of the problem is that I decide to do things like make gingerbread cookies well after full dark…when I have to go to the dentist the next morning, which means no time to play with the natural light the next morning.

I feel like this is a small price to pay for cookies.

Pro-tip: When a recipe reads to add an egg, make sure to actually, you know, add an egg. Not that I’m speaking from experience or anything.

Original recipe here

1 egg

1 cup sugar

3/4 cup butter, softened

1/4 cup molasses (I used blackstrap)

1/4 tea salt

2 heaping tea ginger

1 tea pumpkin spice

1 tea baking soda

2  cups flour

Cream butter and sugar. Add egg and molasses, mix until well combined.

Start slowly adding dry ingredients, adding flour in 1/2 cup measures until well combined.

Using your hands, roll dough into balls (…I rolled mine into fairly big balls and got 13 cookies).

Bake at 350 for 8-10 minutes

31daysofbaking

Feel free to link up a recipe if you’re baking this season~