koolaide dyeing

Edward

Edward Olive Green

I have a confession to make.

I hate following other people’s dye recipes. I don’t trust them. I know that I post mine, and I hope that people are capable of replicating my results.

But this project is exactly why I don’t follow other people’s dye recipes. I was going to do a solar dyeing course while I was on vacation, which fell through in large part because of a freak Polar Vortex that is relevant to my fiber art in more ways than one. I knew I was going to have fiber coming out of my ears, so I decided to start a project I’ve had on my mind-one that was supposed come out navy blue.

When I mixed the dye pot, it was murky green. But I plunged ahead anyway, deciding to be trusting for once.

So this is how Edward is a yellow leaning olive. I like it, I actually really like it, but it’s no navy blue and this is why I won’t follow people’s dye recipes.

The naming for this one comes from a Lady Edward, a figure who featured in the English World War I peace movement.

Edward

2 packages blue koolaide or similar (sample is dyed with ice blue lemonade)

1 package orange

This is your base dye pot. Start with about 2 ounces wool for coverage shown in photos.

 

Bloggers-I have started a new group board on Pinterest. Open to all DIY, craft, food, or other creative blogs, I would love to have you join. Joining instructions are posted on the board-join here.

Please, stop by this week’s Inspired Weekends!

Linked to-

create with joy

carolyn’s homework

the chicken chick

the prairie homestead

a pinch of joy

frugal by choice

vmg206

mamaldiane

pink when

Dubh You Even Know?

I don’t take a lot of custom dyes or spinning projects because they sort of make me nervous. I’m always afraid that I’m going to make something that they don’t want.

But I will, however, continue with a project that I started as a gift for someone as a custom piece.

Another round of Dubh, this time over 3-ply Costwold. It’s about 1/3 of the yardage of first batch which shifted this one darker than the first. Oddly, it exhausted more than the first as well, which is not the direction that I would have thought this would have gone.

dubh2

Dubh

base wool: Cream Cotswold from Windsong Farm Originals

ply: n-ply

wpi: 11

yardage: 108

dye: food grade w/ citric acid

Bloggers-I have started a new group board on Pinterest. Open to all DIY, craft, food, or other creative blogs, I would love to have you join. Joining instructions are posted on the board-join here.

Please, stop by this week’s Inspired Weekends!

Linked to-

mommy a to z

lady bug blessings

vmg206

the tasty fork

the self sufficient homeacre

joyful homemaking

i should be mopping the floor

a pinch of joy

nifty thrifty things

titi craft

flour me with love

Dye What You Can When You Can-Dyelot, Fiber Choice, and Acidity

dubhdubhbatch2

You know how store-bought yarn comes with a warning to make sure to purchase enough yarn at any given time to finish a project because of dye lot variations?

This holds even more true for hand dyeing, especially when you work with a method like solar or kettle dyeing.

It is exceptionally hard to maintain the same color across batches, especially if you have to vary fiber choice later on down the line. That can have a lot of fun; different protein fibers take up color in different ways-and even differing types of the same fiber such as different wool breeds will impact your color way. This can be a lot of fun and is actually part of the appeal of hand dyeing for me.

One of the greatest impacts on the dyeing process is the amount (and even type) of acid used. A ‘good’ dyer will make sure that every batch has the same amount of acid, of the same type, across the board. I’m a child of chaos so when I dye I rarely do that, though I do mark what I did in my dyeing notebook in case I have to try to mimic what I did before for a sale, trade, or supplement a custom job I gave as a gift.

When using a dyeing technique known for volatile results like solar dyeing or kettle dyeing, both of which being techniques that like to break colors, keep in mind you’re not going to get it to mimic perfectly every time. You can probably get the colors to break again but not in the same places to the same extent.

The bottom line: make sure you dye large enough amounts to fulfill your intended projects, or make sure you’re okay with two radically different lots in case it happens.

Both blues pictured are both Dubh batches; they differ slightly in acid strength and wool choice. The latter came out much darker and richer than the first, which came out a much brighter, stronger neon color, though the darker breaks are the shades in the second skein.

Bloggers-I have started a new group board on Pinterest. Open to all DIY, craft, food, or other creative blogs, I would love to have you join. Joining instructions are posted on the board-join here.

Please, stop by this week’s Inspired Weekends!

Linked to-

vmg206

 

 

Alexandria

I name my yarns after words that I like to say out loud. That’s my naming scheme for this year; there’s really nothing more complicated to it than that.

My stress level is through the roof right now, so I’m spinning and dyeing everything I can get my hands on. I just sorted out my koolaide stash; I’m heavy on stuff I thought I would be low on and almost out of the colors I normally have by the bucketful.

Filter actually shifts yarn closer to true color

Filter actually shifts yarn closer to true color

Alexandria

base wool: heinz 57 from the woolery

ply: n-ply

wpi: 12

yardage: 159 yds

dye: food grade w/ citric acid

This is a completely unreproduceable skein. This is what the roving looked like coming out of the pot:

alexandria rovingI’m never going to get it to break like that again.

Colors: purple, red, blue, pink, aqua, cream/natural

Bloggers-I have started a new group board on Pinterest. Open to all DIY, craft, food, or other creative blogs, I would love to have you join. Joining instructions are posted on the board-join here.

Please, stop by this week’s Inspired Weekends!

Linked to-

frugal by choice

the chicken chick

the prairie homestead

mamaldiane

carolyn’s homework

the dedicated house

DIY: Dyeing Yarn with Koolaide (Part 3) {Spring Through Your Stash}

Now for the fun part!

This yarn is called Dubh. I’ll post final information such as weight and yardage once it’s fully dry. It was still damp this morning.

How to Koolaide Dye Yarn on Your Stovetop

1. Select your yarn and tie into hanks. You may want to measure out equal skeins at this point. I didn’t because I’m going to be reskeining anyway.

skeinedbaseI skeined three balls of my n-plied handspun out of the Woolery’s Heinz 57 roving using my hardcover copy of A Gathering of Lace. Very scientific.

2. Soak your wool. Or not.

nakeddubhI soaked the hanks in the hottest water out of my tap for 20 minutes while I prepped the dye bath. You don’t actually need to soak your yarn, but what the dye does is marginally impacted by the dryness of the fiber going into the pot. Wool takes roughly 20 minutes to fully soak. You can add some vinegar to this stage if you want, or are using it.

3. Prep your dye pot

dubhdyeboxdubhdyebathI decided to go with Wilton’s and citric acid for this batch. Citric acid is what makes Koolaide tart, and it’s already in the packets. Since I’m not using Koolaide for this batch, I covered the bottom of a mason jar with loose powdered citric acid and then added a little hot water. Into the jar went:

scant 1/8 tea each

sky blue

royal blue

aqua

3 drops each

liquid no name blue

liquid black

Mix throughly to make sure all dye is diluted.

wearglovesYou might want to wear gloves.

4. Set Up Your Pot

dubhbathThe advantage of stove top is that it’s both faster, and generally your pot is going to be bigger. You have more room to work. I dumped the dye into the bottom of the pot, then added more water to the jar to wash out residue dyes. I plopped the wool into the pot (no serious thought to how it went in) and added the soak water to the pot. You want the water level to cover the wool, or the majority of it anyway. The longer it’s in there, the more submerged it’s going to get but you don’t want yarn well above the water level either.

5. Heat

13minutes 32minutes 50minutesNow comes the waiting. Set your pot to medium and start checking on it every ten minutes or so. Eventually you’re going to see the water lighten and the yarn take the color up. You’ll know it’s exhausted when the water goes clear or a sort of milky white. A white plastic spoon or measuring cup will help you check on the progress. I pulled this batch at the 50 minute mark, and the bath hadn’t exhausted.

6. Processing

dubhOnce you have the color you want or the bath is exhausted, pull from heat. When the yarn is cool enough to handle, take out of pot and hang to dry.

At this point you might want to reskein because it may have gotten messy in the bath.

If you want, you can also gently wash your dyed yarn in a weak vinegar bath to help set any loose dye in the yarn. I might end up doing that with this batch as it’s a gift.

If you notice dye transfer once you use the yarn, wash in a weak vinegar bath to set the dye further.

Bloggers-I have started a new group board on Pinterest. Open to all DIY, craft, food, or other creative blogs, I would love to have you join. Joining instructions are posted on the board-join here.

Please, stop by this week’s Inspired Weekends!

Linked to-

the chicken chick

little house in the suburbs

 

 

DIY: Dyeing Yarn with Koolaide (Part 2) {Spring Through Your Stash}

SAMSUNG

Part 2: Color Theory

…And not just the ‘normal’ color theory.

There are certain things to consider with Koolaide dyeing when thinking about color choice:

1. A solid or semi-solid dye is going to be easier to start out with, and see if you even want to continue with this. You may find you really hate the way that hot Koolaide smells.

2. While there are some tips and tricks to working with Koolaide and other food dyes, there are some limitations to what you can do with it.

3. It’s a fairly volatile process, so make sure you’re willing to either re-dye or be satisfied with ‘odd’ results. Some of my favorite yarns came from weird results.

4. Dye in big batches, because you may find it hard to replicate a yarn. Even skeins in the same pot will shift slightly, as a general rule.

Tips with working with color:

Koolaide, and even cake dye to a point, are generally pretty saturated, bright colors. Wilton’s and liquid dyes will have a wider color range, and liquid and gel have the added benefit of a black. If you only get one jar of a liquid dye, make it a black.

Blacks have a tendency of doing what’s called ‘breaking’, which is when your color seperates out and dyes into its component colors. Some people really hate breaking and will either overdye or dye another batch in hopes that that one won’t break. I actually love breaking; I want my yarns to look like they’re not machine dyed.

Getting familiar with a color wheel will help adjust the range of colors that you get. Adding a drop or two of green to a red batch will take it from Elmo red to something closer to blood, for example. But don’t overload with contrasting colors or your colors may go rusty or too brown-leaning muted. Which may work out too.

One of the easiest ways of toning down a bright dye pot is by overdying something other than plain white. I rarely dye stark white. You can successfully overdye any color with another color if you keep two things in mind: you have to be dyeing darker, and you have to be willing to take your results.

Finally, for this part of color theory: saturation point. There will come a point where you just have to live with the yarn as it is. You can generally almost always overdye a dark yarn darker, but eventually the yarn will take all the dye it can handle and you’re not going to get anymore color into the fiber.

spring through your stashThis year’s spring Knit-a-long is actually a Craft-a-long. Whatever your favorite craft is, it’s welcome!

The only requirement is that we’re trying to work down stashed materials. Every project that you work on for the CAL should incorporate stashed materials, the more the better. You can purchase materials as necessary, but the majority of your project(s) should use materials you already own. Beyond that, have fun! Knit, spin, crochet, paper craft, sew…whatever moves you! You can follow along in the comments or link up on the Spring Through Your Stash posts up every week. The Craft-a-long will run through the first day of summer.

Bloggers-I have started a new group board on Pinterest. Open to all DIY, craft, food, or other creative blogs, I would love to have you join. Joining instructions are posted on the board-join here.

Please, stop by this week’s Inspired Weekends!

Linked to-

sunny simple life

little house in the suburbs