Month: October 2013

Tuesday Fiber-Hazeltine Scarf

Originally posted in 2011 for Halloween, the Hazeltine Scarf is a cabled project that will help beginning/intermediate knitters ease into more complicated cables.

A basic to intermediate level cable that looks more complex that what it actually it is. The pattern does require that you understand basic cabling techniques.

Elongated Left Slanted Cable

Worked over 4 stitches

All even rows are purled

rows 1, 3, 5, 7- knit

rows 9 and 19- bring two stitches to the front, either air cabling or on a cable needle, k2, k2 from needle

rows 11, 13, 15, 17- knit

Elongated Right Slanted Cable

Worked over 4 stitches

All even rows are purled

rows 1, 3, 5, 7- knit

rows 9 and 19- bring two stitches to the back, either air cabling or on a cable needle, k2, k2 from needle

rows 11, 13, 15, 17- knit

Central Panel- Entwined Lozenges from Mon Tricot’s Knitting Dictionary*

worked over 16 stitches

all even rows are worked as presented (k the knit stitches and p the purl stitches)

Rows 1- k2, p4, k4, p4, k2

Row 3- k2, p4, work right leaning cable (leave 2 to the back, k2, knit 2 reserved stitches), p4, k2

row 5- cross 2 left (leave 2 stitches at front of work, p1, k2 reserved stitches), p2, cross 2 right (leave 1 stitches at back of work, k2, p1 reserved stitches), cross 2 left, p2, cross 2 right

row 7- p1, cross 2 left, cross 2 right, p2, cross 2 left, cross 2 right, p1

row 9- p2, work right leaning cable, p4, work right leaning cable, p2

row 11- p2, k4, p4, k4, p2

row 13- p2, work right leaning cable, p4, work right leaning cable, p2

row 15- p1, cross 2 right, cross 2 left, p2, cross 2 right, cross 2 left, p1

row 17- cross 2 right, p2,  cross 2 left, cross 2 right, p2, cross 2 left

row 19- k2, p4, work right leaning cable (leave 2 to the back, k2, knit 2 reserved stitches), p4, k2

row 21- k2, p4, k4, p4, k2

Scarf

Cast on 34 stitches with yarn of your choice (gauge doesn’t matter). The scarf shown was knit on size 8 bamboo needles with 1 skein of red heart super saver in dark orchid.

Work 3 rows of garter stitch.

next row: k3, place marker, work row one of elongated right slanted cable, place marker, p2, place marker, work row one of central panel, place marker, p2, place marker, work first row of elongated left slanted cable, place marker, k3.

continue working in pattern until scarf is desired length. Work 3 rows of garter stitch and bind off.

*I believe the book was published in 1986 by the editors of Mon Tricot. All I can determine online is that it’s out of print. The pattern is found on page 77. I don’t claim ownership of this particular stitch.

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Fall Into the Holidays #6

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Remember! I’ll be pinning all entries linked up to the Fall Into the Holidays board-please let me know if you want to be removed.

It’s that time of year again! Time to start thinking autumn, holidays, and changing seasons! Feel free to share your seasonal recipes, diy, crafts, and other related material! Please link to entries, and not your blog main page. Click around the list and leave a few comments!

Featured Projects from Fall Into the Holidays #5

Seams Unbiased Flourless Chocolate Peanut Butter Cookies

Black Fox Home’s Soaked Pumpkin Streusel Muffins

Bloggers and readers! Horrific Knits has an opportunity for you! I am planning a 31 Days of Baking theme for the month of December. If you would like to submit a recipe or post about baking in any form-including memories-please email content and photos to horrificknits at gmail dot com by November 24th. All recipes welcome, as long as it pertains to baking.

Please remember to link back to this party on your entry and have fun! Please click the icon below. The link up loads in a new page.

On My Bookshelf

The Man Who Invented Christmas:How Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol Rescued His Career and Revived Our Holiday Spirits Les Standiford

It’s odd what I take away from books. Did you know that Vincent Price starred in a version of A Christmas Carol? This is a look primarily at the events leading up to Dickens writing Carol and its impact on his life. It’s actually pretty astonishing how the book hit English culture and took off running. I do wish the book had stopped slightly earlier; it seemed like the last few chapters dragged. Overall though, a pretty interesting read.

This Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War

Death is both exceptionally simple and terribly complicated. The American Civil War had one of the strongest and most lingering influences on the structures in place for the social conceptualization of death in the nation’s history; perhaps the only other major military events to shape attitudes to a greater degree were World War I and Vietnam. This is a fairly dense read, though fascinating, especially with its dealings with the concept of a good death. Modern readers used to a sanitized death behind hospital doors may not be aware of how much death changed in that four year period.

Pumpkinhead

Subtitle: how classism and cultural tourism will get you killed.

I love how 80s horror has this deep vein of ‘you’re a horrible person, middle America, and deserve everything you get’. A group of young adults heads into the back country to go to the lake, and on the way finds this quaint little town of the poorest of the poor. Taunted with the story of Pumpkinhead (but no explanation) they manage to kill a child. And of course since no one cares about poor kids, all hell breaks out. A deliberate choice of words, there.

I love the way that this film looks. Sitting somewhere between fairy tale and The Hills Have Eyes, there’s a fuzzy dreamlike yellowness  to each shot that I’ve really started to like in the last year or so. In some scenes it starts to look like classic versions of Dracula or Frankenstein with the stereotypical Transylvanian fog.

I suppose that I should be upset about the method through which the titular villain comes into being-but if we can’t embrace our darkness then we’re only sort of half developed. And frankly, no one comes out smelling clean and fresh in a horror film.

Fall Vegetable Bake

Bloggers and readers! Horrific Knits has an opportunity for you! I am planning a 31 Days of Baking theme for the month of December. If you would like to submit a recipe or post about baking in any form-including memories-please email content and photos to horrificknits at gmail dot com by November 24th. All recipes welcome, as long as it pertains to baking.

I’ve started baking for Christmas; or rather, I’ve started screening recipes for December. But one cannot live on cookies alone-unless you ask my boyfriend, who would like to argue that point.

This is a simple, satisfying bake that’s endlessly modifiable. Add more or less of the vegetables that you like, or have. If you use a dairy-free cheese the dish is vegan. Try it for a fall meatless Monday meal.

*For best results, make sure you slice your vegetables as uniformly as possible. Use a mandolin for best results.

Fall Vegetable Bake

-assorted fall vegetables like squash, onions, potatoes, and apples

-favorite cheese

-cooking oil

-all purpose salt free spice mix

In a baking dish, layered sliced vegetables and apples. I don’t peel my potatoes or apples for this dish as long as they’re thinly sliced.

Spray or brush with cooking oil and season liberally with spice mix.

Cover with cheese and bake at 350 for 20 to 30 minutes.

Have you linked up to Fall Into the Holidays this week? Please stop by!

Linked to-

I should be mopping the floor     Memories by the Mile     Lamberts Lately

A Pinch of Joy     Love Bakes Good Cakes

Clairejustine     Mom’s Test Kitchen

The Chicken Chick     Lady Behind the Curtain

Momnivore’s Dilemna      Frugally Sustainable

Call Me PMC     Cultured Palate

The Dedicated House